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International Walk to School Month


IWALK Organizing Materials :

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IWALK Month Activity Ideas:

These IWALK activities are listed by appropriate audience. If you have a great IWALK idea, please send it to us and we'll include it in this list. Note that all activities have been linked to the Ontario curriculum. Make your selection below:

Legend:
Icons have been included with each activity listed below, as an at-a-glance summary of the topic(s) covered.
physical activity
safety
air quality
climate change
Physical Activity
Safety
Air Quality
Climate Change

Parent Councils
IWALK and the Terry Fox Run
physical activity
The Terry Fox Run has been taking place for almost 30 years now. If your school usually participates in this annual event why not team up the run with IWALK? Your school can incorporate the Terry Fox theme into physical activity, geography, biology, history and more. Challenge the students to walk to school by ‘walking’ the same route that Terry Fox took across Canada. Call us for a Cross Canada Walking Map.
Ontario Curriculum: 1p31, 1z5, 2z6, 2z11, 3p36, 4p33, 4z45, 4z54, 5p39, 5s26, 7p41.
 
Bicycle Rodeos
physical activity
Teach safety skills to students and provide some fun exercise. Create an obstacle course in the school yard with chalk, traffic cones, stop signs and sponges (to indicate obstacles). Contact your local Police division or Public Health Department for information on setting up a Bike Rodeo. See Marin County's (California) lesson plan ideas for further details.
Ontario Curriculum: 4p10, 5p21, 5p29, 6p18, 7p22, 8p14, 8p22.
 
Passports
physical activity
Use passports that can be stamped with every walking trip a student makes. This method helps to keep track of which students walked to school and how often. Also, join the IWALK Club where students receive their own IWALK Club member card to keep track of their trips to school.
Ontario Curriculum: 1p32, 2p31, 3p31, 4z24, 4z45, 6p30.
 
Steps Across Canada
physical activity
Contact local sports equipment stores and ask if they will donate pedometers for students to keep track of their daily steps. Some schools have incorporated a theme of "Steps Across Canada" and, using Green Communities Cross Canada Walking Poster Map, are stepping out across the country. To receive a Cross Canada poster and associated resources, please register here and select "Cross Canada Walking Poster".
Ontario Curriculum: 3p31, 5p34, 7p37, 8p36.
 
Community Mascots Walk to School
physical activity
Many communities and schools have mascots that can 'walk to school' with the students on IWALK Day. If your community doesn't have a mascot, why not create your own!

Ontario Curriculum: 5p35.
 
Family First
physical activity
Ask the families that live furthest from the school to start a Walking School Bus for IWALK Day and have them walk with a banner collecting other families along the way. Along the routes search for 'Freddie the Foot' Adobe PDF Adobe PDF Adobe (PDF - 106 KB). Here is an image of just 'Freddie'. JPG Image Image (JPG - 54 KB)
Ontario Curriculum: 1p37, 2p40, 3p39, 4p36.
 
Funky Dress for IWALK Week
safety
Encourage students to have fun with their clothing during IWALK Week. Some ideas include:
  • Dress in one primary colour
  • Wear clothes backwards
  • Decorate sneakers
  • Make and wear fun hats
  • Wear bright and reflective clothing
Students can then have a school yard fashion show Adobe PDF Adobe (PDF - 142 KB) at recess.
Ontario Curriculum: 5a54, 5a6, 6a6, 6a63, 7a5, 7a59, 7a64, 7a65, 8a43, 8a47.
 
School Challenges
physical activity
Have an IWALK challenge with another local school, even if they are part of a different school district. This can help to create community-wide action for safer walking routes as well as providing some friendly competition. Ashley Oaks Public School in London, Ontario, challenged several local schools in their neighbourhood and they are now working on other combined actions for their community.
Ontario Curriculum: 3p38, 4p35, 5p40, 6p34, 7p42, 8p41.
 
Combine IWALK with local fundraising initiatives
physical activity safety air quality  climate change
Rosedale Public School in Sarnia, Ontario, encouraged students who walked to school on IWALK Day to bring a non-perishable food item for their local food bank. This good deed was covered in their local newspaper.

Ontario Curriculum: 2z3, 5p35, 6p29.
 
Success Story
Read a case study of Morton Way Public School, which has successfully implemented an active transportation program.
Ontario Curriculum: 7m81, 7m83, 7m86, 7m95, 7m103, 7s18, 8m91, 8m93, 8m94, 8m97, 8m98, 8m104.

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Teachers

Legend:
physical activity
safety
air quality
climate change
Physical Activity
Safety
Air Quality
Climate Change
 
Clean Air Achievers Program
physical activity safety air quality  climate change
Clean Air Champions Encourage students to get active for the environment. Students record their travel habits using an online Trip Tracker, and challenge themselves to use active modes of transportation whenever possible. The program draws the links between environment, transportation and health issues and encourages youth to make more sustainable lifestyle choices. The Clean Air Achievers program includes a comprehensive Teachers' Manual, and two classroom visits from a Clean Air Champion; a national and/or Olympic level athlete. Suitable for students in Grades 7, 8 and 9.
www.cleanairachievers.ca
 
Hand out Canada's Physical Activity Guide to students and parents
physical activity
The guide has excellent ideas for encouraging daily physical activity. Contact your local health unit for copies of the guide, or access it online.
Ontario Curriculum: 2p32, 3p31, 3p32, 4p29, 5p35, 6p30, 7p37, 8p36.
 
IWALK and the Terry Fox Run
physical activity
The Terry Fox Run has been taking place for almost 30 years now. If your school usually participates in this annual event why not team up the run with IWALK? Your school can incorporate the Terry Fox theme into physical activity, geography, biology, history and more. Challenge the students to walk to school by 'walking' the same route that Terry Fox took across Canada. Call us for a Cross Canada Walking Map.
Ontario Curriculum: 1p31, 1z5, 2z6, 2z11, 3p36, 4p33, 4z45, 4z54, 5p39, 5s26, 7p41.
 
Theme Days
physical activity safety air quality  climate change
Select themes for every day during IWALK Week. Here are some suggestions: Give each day a name. Here are some examples: Marching Monday, Trekking Tuesday, Walking/Wheeling Wednesdays, Hike and Bike Thursday, Thundering Thursday, Footloose Friday. Use holidays as themes as well: Turkey Trot, Winter Walkin' Day, Halloween Monster March.
Ontario Curriculum: 1p32, 2p33, 5p35.
 
Other Crazy Ideas
safety
Crazy Hair Day: Students colour or spike their hair to create awareness of walkers. Crazy Sneaker Parade: Students can decorate their sneakers for IWALK Day. These can be shown off in an IWALK fashion show. Parent Council can arrange for a 'best dressed sneaker' contest with prizes. Download the activity sheet Adobe PDF Adobe (PDF - 142 KB).
Ontario Curriculum: 1p33, 2p33, 2a29, 2a41, 3a35, 6a38, 7a46, 8a35.
 
Globe Trotting
physical activity
Choose five continents (one for each day of IWALK Week) and learn about their cultures, dress, wildlife, food, etc. This idea can incorporated with themed ideas for each day. For example, students create artwork from each continent to carry with them on their walks (i.e. flags). Click here for resources.
Ontario Curriculum: 2z25, 2z29, 2z35, 7g27, 7g36, 7q44.
 
Eye Spy
physical activity safety air quality  climate change
Ask students to pick an "eye spy" theme for each day of IWALK Week, for example, eye spy safe things, unsafe things, things that pollute, etc. Click here for resources.
Ontario Curriculum: 1z49, 3p10, 4p11.
 
Bicycle Rodeos
physical activity
Teach safety skills to students and provide some fun exercise. Create an obstacle course in the school yard with chalk, traffic cones, stop signs and sponges (to indicate obstacles). Contact your local Police division or Public Health Department for information on setting up a Bike Rodeo. See Marin County's (California) lesson plan ideas for further details.
Ontario Curriculum: 4p10, 5p21, 5p29, 6p18, 7p22, 8p14, 8p22.
 
Calculate Your Walking Pace
physical activity
Using string and sticks, this activity helps students calculate their walking pace in KM/H to determine what kind of walker (i.e. stroller or brisk walker) they are. Download the activity sheet here Adobe PDF Adobe (PDF - 29 KB).
Ontario Curriculum: 3m36, 4m36, 6m42, 6m53, 6m55.
 
Walk Around the World
physical activity
Calculate the cumulative distance that one class or school walks and compare it to distances between major cities all around the world. Another idea is to follow the equator. Join the IWALK Club and receive our Walk Around the World Poster and resources.
Ontario Curriculum: 2z25, 2z35, 7g27, 7g36, 7g44.
 
Thanksgiving Turkey Trot
physical activity
Hold a Turkey Trot during IWALK Week; make a featherless turkey and every time a student walks, add a feather.
Ontario Curriculum: 2p33, 2z6, 2z17, 3z2, 6z5, 6p29.
 
Passports
physical activity
Use passports that can be stamped with every walking trip a student makes. This method helps to keep track of which students walked to school and how often.Also, join the IWALK Club where students receive their own IWALK Club member card to keep track of their trips to school.
Ontario Curriculum: 1p32, 2p31, 3p31, 4z24, 4z45, 6p30.
 
Wild Walking
physical activity climate change
Use wild animals to represent the Four Fitness S's: a) strength - elephant, b) speed - tiger, c) stamina - giraffe, d) suppleness - chimpanzee. Younger children are given masks in the form of these animals to wear while walking to school. Handy image resources available from Arkive.
Ontario Curriculum: 2s5, 2s11, 2s13, 2s14, 2s22, 4s16, 4s18, 6s21.
 
Greening the Trees
climate change air quality
Each student draws a tree without branches. They also draw and cut out leaves. Every time the student walks to or from school, they add a leaf to their tree. This shows that walking to school can contribute to a greener world.
Ontario Curriculum: 1a31, 1a35, 2a38, 2a45, 3a29, 3a21, 4a37.
 
How Much Pollution is that Car Producin'?
climate change air quality
An activity that helps students measure and calculate the amount of pollution that their family's car produces on an average school trip. The end result of this activity is that students can actually feel the full weight of walking to school. Download the activity package here Adobe PDF Adobe .
Ontario Curriculum: 5e61, 5m3, 5s62, 6e51, 6m31, 6m106, 7m28, 7s3, 8s137.
 
Eco Points Score Card
climate change air quality
This team game assigns points to daily activities that require fossil fuel and/or electricity. The higher the score, the higher the team's impact on the environment. See Marin County's (California) lesson plan ideas for further details.
Ontario Curriculum: 5s57, 5s69, 5s70, 5s71, 6s77, 7g50.
 
Take the Nature Challenge
climate change air quality
Visit the David Suzuki Foundation web site and have your class take the Nature Challenge.
Ontario Curriculum: 4s16, 4s18, 4s19, 7g63, 7g64, 7s18, 7s23, 7s24.
 
Police Officer for a Day
safety
With teacher supervision, provide students with small spiral notebooks to record traffic and pedestrian violations they see as they walk to school (i.e. cars not coming to a complete stop, drivers not using their turning signals, etc.). This helps the students to become aware and alert pedestrians. The U.S. CDC has a great guide that outlines this activity.
Ontario Curriculum: 4p19, rp14, 8p14.
 
Traffic Pollution Survey

air quality

This is an interesting experiment to test local air pollution. Two locations are chosen: one by a busy street and the other far from a busy street. Students find a tree or a leafy bush (same species throughout the experiment) and lightly apply a piece of tape to each leaf, one from the busy street and the other from the non-busy street. These pieces of tape are placed in a notebook and labelled. The piece of tape from the busier street will be darker than the one from the non-busy street.
Ontario Curriculum: 7s10, 7s18, 7s20.
 
Decorate the School Fence with IWALK Posters
physical activity safety air quality  climate change
Have classes of students create colourful banners and poster with IWALK related themes for the school fence. This promotes the event to the entire community.
Ontario Curriculum: 5p35, 5a31, 6a30, 7p32, 7a44, 7a45, 8p36, 8a26.
 
Puppet Show
physical activity safety air quality  climate change
Students can make puppets from various materials and then write a puppet skit about walking to school that can be presented to the school.
Ontario Curriculum: 1a49, 1a58, 1a59, 2a53, 2a59, 2a65, 3a54, 3a59, 4a62, 5a59, 6a65, 7a62, 7a70, 7a78, 8a47, 8a58, 8a60, 8a61.

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Students - JK to Grade 8
Be sure to have adult permission and supervision for these activities.
Legend:
physical activity
safety
air quality
climate change
Physical Activity
Safety
Air Quality
Climate Change
 
Ideas for Drama Students
physical activity safety air quality  climate change
Create short skits about the benefits of walking to school. Take the skit from class to class.
Ontario Curriculum: 1a49, 1a58, 1a59, 2a53, 2a59, 2a65, 3a54, 3a59, 4a62, 5a59, 6a65, 7a62, 7a70, 7a78, 8a47, 8a58, 8a60, 8a61.
 
Walk to School Fashion Show
physical activity safety  
Students organize a 'walk to school' fashion show to a medley of 'walking tunes'. Download the activity package Adobe PDF Adobe .
Ontario Curriculum: 5a54, 5a6, 6a63, 6a6, 7a59, 7a63, 7a65, 7a5, 8a43, 8a47.
 
Promotional Assembly
physical activity safety air quality  climate change
The week before IWALK, hold a school-wide promotional assembly. This will boost school spirit, get students excited about the event, and review pedestrian safety. A great way to incorporate a 'Walk to School' fashion show or skit.
Ontario Curriculum: 4p24, 6p27, 7p32.
 
Sidewalk Chalk the School Yard
physical activity
Use sidewalk chalk to trace your footsteps on the sidewalk around the school. Create a 'walk of fame' and have walking students sign their names in the shoes around the school.
Ontario Curriculum: 4a41, 5a31, 5a32, 5a37.

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High Schools
Consultez cette partie en français
Legend:
[AQ]
[CC]
[DC]
[ED]
[PA]
Air Quality
Climate Change
Developing Culture
Education
Physical Activity
 
Create a Presentation on Climate Change
[ED]

"The climate system is an angry beast and we are poking it with sticks." Dr. Wallace Broeker, Geochemist, Columbia University.

A presentation on climate change for an assembly or a class is a fantastic way of bringing your peers up to speed on all aspects of the climate change issue. The STEP Program developed our Climate Change PowerPoint Presentation (choose "save" to download to your computer - note that this presentation is only available in English) for High Schools. You are welcome to use it, or take away some ideas from it for your own presentation. This presentation can be downloaded and used as a template to present your own talk.

The presentation starts by examining how we are treating our planet, and discusses positive climate strategies that are being employed around the world, and are capable of improving the health of our world.

It offers an opportunity to discuss the science of climate change, defining the carbon cycle and the greenhouse gas effect, and different methods for measuring carbon in our atmosphere.

Popular myths associated with climate change are addressed, before opening the presentation up to a discussion of sustainability. Sustainability is addressed in terms of energy production, transportation, lifestyle choices and community design. The presentation wraps up with some questions designed to provoke discussion and open the floor to further debate.

Ontario Curriculum: SES 4U-Earth and Space Science, The Earth as a Planet; SPH 3U-Physics, Energy Work and Power; ENG 4U, ENG 4C, ENG 3U, ENG 3C, ENG 2P, ENG 2D, ENG 1P, ENG 1D-English, Language; CGD 3M-The Americas: Geographic Patterns and Issues, Understanding and Managing Change; SNC 2D-Science, Biology: The Sustainability of Ecosystems, Earth and Space Science: Weather Dynamics; SNC 2P-Science, Ecosystems and Human Activity, Earth and Space Science: Weather Systems; CGC 1D, CGC 1P-Geography of Canada, Human-Environment Interactions, Understanding and Managing Change, Global Connections..

 
Coordinate an Anti-idling Campaign
[AQ] [CC] [ED]
Idling is a huge contributor of greenhouse gas emissions, but most people don’t realize how bad it is. Combined with misinformation over whether idling is good for your engine (it’s not!), a targeted anti-idling campaign is a great way to raise awareness about this issue. Some proven strategies that schools have implemented include handing out “I don’t idle” buttons, “Turn off the engine” stickers for cars, informational pamphlets on the effects of idling, or fake traffic tickets to remind drivers of the damage they are doing. Visit Natural Resources Canada website for awesome ideas and our STEP page and High School No Idling resource document to see how schools in Markham and Peterborough tackled this issue.

Ontario Curriculum: HIF 2O-Individual and Family Living-Personal and Social Responsibilities; CHV 2O-Civics, Active Citizenship; SNC 2D-Science, Biology: The Sustainability of Ecosystems, Earth and Space Science: Weather Dynamics; SNC 2P-Science, Ecosystems and Human Activity, Earth and Space Science: Weather Systems.
 
Host a Bike Mechanics Workshop at School
[PA] [ED]
Many students ride their bikes on a regular basis, but could use a refresher on how those fabulous machines work. Here’s a great chance to empower your friends and classmates to identify what kind of work their bikes need, and to make their own simple repairs. Contact your local cycling organization or store to find a mechanic who may be able to help out. Download a couple of handouts to help with the workshop from this YWALK site.

Ontario Curriculum: TTJ 2O-Transportation Technology, Impact and Consequences; TTJ 3C-Transporation Technology, Skills and Processes.

 
Attach Gift Packages to Bikes in the Schoolyard
[DC]

Attach a gift package to bikes in the schoolyard as a thank you for cycling. Help spread the word that cyclists (and walkers) deserve thanks! Not only are they improving traffic congestion, air quality, and the safety of local streets, but they are getting fit and having fun in the process. These modern-day heroes deserve to be recognized for all that work!

There are so many ways to say it:

  • "I love my bike" buttons
  • fortune cookies – with cycling-themed fortunes
  • reflective ankle bands
  • small bag of candies

It is best to distribute these prizes right before the end of the school day to avoid the effects of weather and vandalism, or to hand them out in the morning as your school heroes come in.

Ontario Curriculum: CHV 2O-Civics, Active Citizenship; HIF 2O-Individual and Family Living-Self and Others; PLF 4C-Recreation and Fitness Leadership, Facilitation of Recreation and Leisure; HFA 4M-Food and Nutrition Sciences, Personal and Social Responsibilities; PPL 1O, PPL 2O, PPL 3O, PPL 4O-Healthy Active Living Education, Active Living.

 
Start a Bike or Skateboarding Club
[DC] [PA]

Start a bike or skateboarding club to foster a culture and sense of belonging around alternative transportation at your school. The i-am for youth cyclists (iafyc) project was an action research initiative that followed Arthur Orsini’s Master’s of Arts Thesis in Environmental Education and Communications. Teenagers who regularly cycle to high school were recruited and asked to describe the previous influences and current motivators that they believe led them to cycle as much as they do. Six Vancouver teenagers participated in the project: they each completed a questionnaire and attended an individual interview before coming together in a group interview to discuss

a three-wheel chopper bike
similarities and differences in their experiences. Following all the ‘talk’ they designed and built their own chopper bikes and cycled together in a mini-Critical Mass through the streets of East Vancouver. The entire process was documented in a funky 24-minute video - Cycle for Life: Influences and Motivators for Youth Cyclists.

this is what a cyclist looks like
(art project by Arthur Orsini)

This research methodology gave a voice to teenage cyclists and their significant life experiences. The subject matter ventured beyond typical topics of cycling safety and environmental awareness to include fun (monthly Critical Mass rides), community-building (the East Van Chopper Fest) and cycling as activism against the car-culture and social revolution. The video highlights the strong social and creative network that exists for youth cyclists in Vancouver, and encourages youth and cyclists elsewhere to seek out (or establish) their own local networks.


  • students already cycling to school need to be supported (and consulted!) in the creation of strategies to encourage their friends to cycle with them
  • networking with local cycling groups can build students’ sense of camaraderie and community
  • high school welding shop classes should be encouraged to offer chopper bike building workshops
  • fun and community-building are essential components of cycling advocacy – regular group bike rides can strengthen the promotion of cycling and active transportation

For more information on the iafcy research project, or to order a DVD copy of the video Cycle for Life: Influences and Motivators For Youth Cyclists ($35 CDN postage included) please contact Arthur at .

Ontario Curriculum: PPL 1O, PPL 2O, PPL 3O, PPL 4O-Healthy Active Living Education, Active Living; TTJ 2O-Transportation Technology, Impact and Consequences; TTJ 3C-Transporation Technology, Skills and Processes; TDJ 2O Technological Design, Sills and Processes, Impact and Consequences; PLF 4C-Recreation and Fitness Leadership, Facilitation of Recreation and Leisure.

 
Invite a Guest to Speak on Physical Activity and Climate Change
[CC] [PA] [DC]

Clean Air ChampionsInvite a guest speaker to inspire the student body on what they can do about physical activity and climate change. Clean Air Champions (CAC), in partnership with the Government of Canada, is offering up to 20 high schools (youth ages 15 – 25) in Ottawa and the Greater Toronto Area the opportunity to host one of their dynamic Clean Air Champions. Clean Air Champions are Canada's top national team, Olympic or Paralympic athletes, and they speak with students on issues of climate change, air quality and health. Visit their website for more details on this organization.

Ontario Curriculum: PPL 1O, PPL 2O, PPL 3O, PPL 4O-Healthy Active Living Education, Active Living; CHV 2O-Civics, Purposeful Citizenship.

 
Post Maps Showing Safe Routes to School
[ED] [CC]

Display transit, local cycling and walking route maps in the cafeteria, so students can see what their options are and pick a safe route to school.

Many students may not be aware of how many transportation options exist for them beyond borrowing the family car. Why not make it easier for everyone to see what’s out there by posting information in a high traffic area at school? Many city councils produce cycling maps showing where safer routes exist for cyclists. Some city groups also produce walking maps, detailing pleasant walks in different neighbourhoods. You can make this area even more useful by adding transit maps, and a ride board to help students who could carpool connect. You can also encourage students to sign up and look for carpooling partners online.

CGC 1D, CGC 1P-Geography of Canada, Human-Environment Interactions; GLE 10, GLS 10-Learning Strategies 1: Skills for Success, Learning Skills; PPZ 3O-Health for Life, Determinates of Health; HIR 3C-Managing Personal and Family Resources, Social Structures, Self and Others, Personal and Social Responsibilities; CGT 3E-Geographics: The Geographer's Toolkit, Methods of Geographic Inquiry.

 
Organize an Active Transportation Challenge
[AQ] [PA]

Organize an active transportation challenge between schools or grades for a week at school; finish it off with a celebration breakfast for everyone who participates.

International Walk to School Week is a great time for a bit of friendly competition – challenge your rival high school to get the greatest percentage of walkers throughout the week, or design an in-school competition between grades or houses. Contact local businesses to get their support and some prizes for the winning groups. Plan a party or celebration pancake breakfast for the last day, when you have a chance to recognize the winning group, and congratulate everyone on their participation.

Ontario Curriculum: ENG 3U-English, Literature Studies and Reading; PLF 4C-Recreation and Fitness Leadership, Physical Fitness and Well-Being; PPL 1O, PPL 2O, PPL 3O, PPL 4O-Healthy Active Living Education, Active Living; AVI 10-Visual Arts, Creation; HRN 1O, HFN 2O, HFA 4M-Food and Nutrition, Personal and Social Responsibilities.

 
Write a Skit or Play on Walking to School
[PA] [ED]

Spread the word about the benefits of choosing active, sustainable transportation to get to school! Write a skit or play on walking to school to perform at a local elementary school. Your schools’ drama club is a great place to develop some creative games and plays to perform for your peers or a younger age group.

For a great example of this, check out the plays performed by Bluevale Collegiate Institute, in Kitchener-Waterloo. With the help of the together4health coalition, they put together DVDs of their performance, available for a small charge. Contact the Region of Waterloo's Health Department at to learn more (downloadable copy coming soon).

For a great example of this, check out the plays performed by Bluevale Collegiate Institute, in Kitchener-Waterloo. They put together DVDs of their performance, available for a small charge. Contact ccolleen@region.waterloo.on.ca at the Region of Waterloo’s health department to learn more or obtain a copy.

Ontario Curriculum: ADA 1O, ADA 2O, ADA 3M, ADA 3O, ADA 4O, ADA 4M-Dramatic Arts, Creation.

 
Create an Environmental Announcement
[ED]

Create an environmental announcement, with a new and interesting fact being read during the weekly announcements at school. Plenty of resources exist to give your school a new fact about the environment and sustainable transportation every day during International Walk to School Week. Here are a few to get you started:

  • Switching from a car to a bike or the bus just 3 days a week, without any other changes, would cut your emissions by about half a tonne. Switch to a bike five days a week, and you've already reached the goal of the one-tonne challenge!
  • Fifty-one per cent of Canadian children aged five to 17 rely on inactive modes of transportation to get to and from school. At the same time, over half of Canadians in that age group are not active enough for optimal growth and development. Do you think there’s a connection?
  • If all Canadians reduced their cruising speed by just five km per hour, total GHG emissions would be reduced by 2.2 megatonnes.
  • The average Canadian student watches approximately 23 hours of TV per week (source - Canadian Paediatric Society). Less screen time allows more time to be physically active as well as more quality time as a family
  • The Canadian Automobile Association estimates that it costs $0.47 per kilometre to own and operate an average vehicle, but the real cost to you and society is actually about $0.92 per kilometre when your time and external costs such as road infrastructure and environmental damage are considered
  • Check the labels on where your food comes from – it could be a long way away. The average food item consumed in Canada today travels some 2,000 km just to get to our tables
  • To make one tonne of paper, 24 trees are cut down, 229,000 litres of water are used, and 30 kg of pollution are emitted. That’s not the end of it, either – throw all that paper in the trash, and a tonne of paper uses 2.5 cubic metres of landfill space
  • The number of cars on the road has increased steadily; people are driving more often and farther distances. Each car travels, on average, 16,000 km/year or about 300 km/week. Limiting the number of kilometres driven by choosing another mode of transportation is by far the best way to reduce air pollution.
  • For distances up to 5 km, cycling is recognized as the fastest of all modes from door to door. Bikes are efficient in more than one way, too - the cost of one auto parking space is at least ten times the cost of a secure bike locker and at least twenty times the cost of secure bike racks, and twelve bikes fit into one car parking space

Ontario Curriculum: CGC 1D, CGC 1P-Geography of Canada, Human-Environment Interactions, Understanding and Managing Change, Global Connections.


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High School Resources:


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More IWALK Week Ideas:

High School (only available in English):

To view more examples of High School activities click here.

 
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Ontario Curriculum Links

We have created a document outlining links between the activity ideas listed on this page and the Ontario curriculum, to make it easier to integrate these teaching tools.


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